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Last Minute [Nerdy] Book Gifts

Is there someone on your Christmas list in need of an amazing gift? Look no further than my [nerdy] Christmas book list recommendations!!

The Ultimate Nerdy Booklist!

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The Big Book of X-Bombers and X-Fighters would make an x-cellent gift for anyone who can appreciate beautiful airplane pictures and startling specs. Steve Pace x-cellently compiles a history of experimental and prototype aircraft on the cutting edge of technology. Your giftee won't want to x-change this beauty, she will be too x-cited navigating its pages! X-ceed her wildest imaginations with pure facts - sometimes reality is more interesting than fantasy! [There are so many X's in this paragraph it may be X-rated....oh geez, I'm full of terrible puns today!]

$25.21 on Amazon
Santa may travel in a sleigh now, but judging by that white beard I bet he flew a fighter plane in World War II (with a younger Mrs. Claus painted on the front no doubt). Fighter! Ten Killer Planes of World War II is the perfect gift for the Santa-aged man in your life - grandpa, dad, uncle, WWII enthusiast, veteran, retiree, etc. And since we are right at the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor this gift couldn't be more timely! Give this to someone with time on their hands so they really get the most out of ingesting the history Laurier has so carefully put together!

$40.00 on Amazon

Kelly Johnson is one of my favorite Aerospace geniuses to read about - he made deals with handshakes, not dollars. For a while he personally cashed checks from the government to Skunk Works due to the extreme sensitivity of the organization's projects! The Projects of Skunk Works spans the gamut from 1943 jet fighters to stealth technology and even the present day stealth boat - Sea Shadow. There are sketches for patents, specifications and interesting flight test stories (downward ejection seat anyone?). This book is for the "Kelly Johnson" in your life - that person who has their own great ideas and tries to convince others they have problems his solution can fix. It's for the person who has unconventional tactics and a thirst for legacy only a book about Skunk Works can provide.

$22.54 on Amazon

This book is a humdinger - SR-71 Flight Manual. Literally it is about 2 inches thick and weighs over 5 pounds (of course I measured that, I'm an engineer). When I pulled this book out of the box Chris and I geeked out pretty hard. There were airfoil plots and lift curves galore, lots of typewriter notes and warnings plus a pretty neat commentary section in the front. This book is for the true aerospace nerd who isn't afraid of numbers or a lack of swoopy graphics. Find that special someone in your life who still carries around a flip phone "because it works" or criticizes the equations in the background on the "Big Bang Theory"...you have Nerdy April's guarantee that this is the book for them!

$46.84 on Amazon

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Full Disclosure: I was provided with a review copy of each of these books from Zenith Press. All opinions, including successful launches (yays) and exploding failures (nays) are purely mine, feel free to engineer your own!

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