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Dexcom Vacation

A quick recap of a T1D pregnancy for anyone who doesn't know: test blood sugar, test blood sugar, freak out about blood sugar on Continuous Glucose Monitor (Dexcom), eat, bolus like crazy, test blood sugar, test blood sugar, freak out, test blood sugar, breathe in, test blood sugar, breathe out, test blood sugar. REPEAT!!!

As you can tell there are a lot of moments when blood is squirting out of my finger and landing on a test strip (about 15 times a day actually). All of these numbers were used to continuously calibrate my Dexcom in order to provide the best possible trending data. Ughhhhh, it was a tough 9 months from this fact alone. So much worry, anxiety, and guilt.

During labor I still had rusty old Dexcom hooked up and Chris became the blood sugar monitor. He completely rocked it out during the pushing phase. My blood sugar remained extremely stable in the 80's for the entire hour or so...it was kind of a Diabetes miracle, right before our little human miracle showed up.

I left the Dexcom sensor on during our hospital stay (only about 24 hours after delivery) but could honestly have cared less about it...after all I was much more preoccupied with little BZ (who is perfect by the way, no issues from my Diabetes). When we got home I promptly ripped it out and relished in taking a shower without so many bionic parts attached and without the whole world having to help me! The sensor sat on my bathroom counter for a few days and the receiver battery eventually died. After 9 months of intense monitoring I just needed a break - mentally from the constant calculations and physically from bulgey-mcbulgerson Dexcom sensor on my arm.

Sorry Dexcom, you don't get this kind of vacation!!
Now I am planning my return to work, and, among other things a return to Dexcom-ing. I know keeping close tabs on my Diabetes is not only a service to my longevity, but it now affects the tiny human I am responsible for. She deserves to have a mom with mostly in-range blood sugars, ha! I guess it's time to blow the dust off the sensor and charge up the receiver, but man this little Dexcom vacation has been nice!


Comments

  1. I know after my last run with surgery I had much the same experience. Until I got out I kept things attached and could not have cared less. I will be happy to continue caring if it keeps me out that surgery suite :)

    I referred your blog to the TUDiabetes web page for the week of May 2, 2016.

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