Monday, July 20, 2015

Midnight Snackin'

Working the night shift is weird for many reasons, one being food!

And Type 1 Diabetes!

And food!

It's strange to shift one's sleep schedule AND one's eating schedule. And it has definitely been a game of guess and check (as in, guess what to eat, check blood sugar, lol). The first night I really don't feel very hungry. Sure I bring along a little snack, but it may or may not be consumed depending on how I'm feeling. The second night I eat my snack to wake up in the middle of my shift; at least my taste buds are awake, maybe they can fly the space station? By the third night, I'm pretty dang hungry around 4am. Lately I've been splitting a Luna Bar in half and noshing on the two halves around 4am and 6am (28 grams of carbs at once spikes the blood sugar a little too much, so splitting it up works perfectly), then I use some delicious red grapes to "fill in the gaps" when I just need a little crunch of something sweet. This is all fine and good during my shift, but what about afterwards?

Well, I usually have something around 20 grams of "slow" carbs when I get home (lately it's been a whole wheat English muffin), then hit the hay for my rest period. The first couple days I wake up around lunch time with some hunger pangs, but by the third day I'm sleeping like a baby through lunch.

I wake up around 4pm and have a small snack to hold me over for dinner (usually around 7pm), then get my snacks together and ready for the next night of shift work.

I would love to say Diabetes plays along with all these schedule shifts, but the truth is, it's a bit of a bear. Often I go low during the day when I'm sleeping, because my body is used to eating during the daytime, so I have to set temporary basal rates to account for missed meals. Then at night it is very dependent on the meal we have for dinner, how much we exercise and my stress level. I test a lot and watch Dexcom almost as much as the space station telemetry!

The truth is, I'm still figuring out the best ways to schedule shift, and each time I have to do it things turn out differently. I guess that's how Diabetes, and life in general, are.