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It's Just Stuff

Six years ago I was absolutely heartbroken. Not because my parents' house burnt down, but because I had to endure watching them struggle ... I felt completely helpless.

They have taught me so much since then, and the most important lesson? It's just stuff. We get so bogged down making sure we have all the right "stuff" never thinking in an instant it might be gone.

A lot of people think about the few things inside their house they would grab in an emergency, but sometimes you aren't given a chance to grab anything. In this case we were all at work or school when the house was struck by lightening. By the time any of use got there it was fully engulfed. No chance to rescue any of those priceless treasures.

The following is an article I wrote shortly after the fire that ran in the East Valley Tribune. I guess you could say my crappy writing is a way of dealing with stressful situations. I honestly have no idea where I found the time to write this, but I remember it helped me...a  lot. I'm thankful for the many blessings that came from our house fire. Even though a significant amount of my "priceless treasures" (read: space camp flight suit, space stuff, sheet music, piano) were destroyed, we were all alive...and that's all that really matters.



I can't believe it's been six years already. Thank you for all your encouragement over these years. It may not be the most exciting or inspiring blog topic, but for me, this was a life changing event. And it means the world that you took the time to read about it.

Comments

  1. I had forgotten about the fire until I saw your posting on FB. I guess time really does heal all things. We have been so blessed in many ways that I count the house fire, in a way, a blessing beyond compare. Love ya and sorry we didn't take better care of the stuff you entrusted to us. Mom

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