Monday, July 9, 2012

Time to cash in on your predictions for THE THING

I heard the familiar "BEEP BEEP BEEP BEEP BEEP BEEP" with an accompanying "BUZZZZ" as the "Shots" song was winding down.

Crap.

Time to take a peak down the ol' wedding dress to see what the deal was. Double crap...my least favorite error everrrrrrr was staring back at me "BUTTON ERROR". Unfortunately me and the "button error" have met before, and unfortunately I knew this error required a pump exchange. With MiniMed. Overnight. On my wedding night. Perfect.

Chris and I chalked it up to proving our vows, right there, on day/night one.

"In sickness and in health."

Maybe this is a good time to point out that those lines, those parts of the vows, really got to me. It hit me the first time as we spoke with our pastor a month or so before the wedding. I thought about them again during the rehearsal. And then the mother-of-all-vows-saying, of course at the wedding. Maybe it's because I knew, with absolute certainty that Chris meant it, "In sickness and in health". He had already shown me that Diabetes didn't matter to him. And he reminded me of that that very first night.

We set our alarm to go off every two hours, I tested my blood sugar and took a correction (if needed). And when I woke up at 7am with a '63' and realized that I had forgotten to pack food, he picked up the phone and ordered me a room service orange juice.

I was not particularly upset with the poor MiniMed man who took my call that night. Deep down I was just happy the Diabetes moment I knew would happen, only happened to me. No one else knew (from the outside at least) that my insulin pump had checked out of the party early. I didn't pass out, or rocket into the stratosphere. I kept dancing and just checked my blood sugar every fifth song or so. It wasn't THAT bad.

Inconvenient? Yes. A total show-stopper? Not a chance.

So, that's "it." The Diabetes "thing" I knew would happen. I wished and hoped and prayed that it wouldn't, but it did. And such is how life with Diabetes goes. You never know how it's going to behave, or how the devices you use to control it are going to behave. The numbers you see on the meter may shock, surprise, or amuse you. And the feelings of pity and anger and helplessness are sometimes hard to shake off. But life goes on, and now my blessed life includes a husband willing to deal with me and D "in sickness and in health." And I couldn't ask for anything better.