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Chris Does Homework for Type 1 Day

Today I am telling you all something you probably already know: I have Type 1 Diabetes. 
It's true.

Today is November 1st, the first day of Diabetes month, and more specifically, Type 1 Day!

I was thinking about what to write for this really special day....
hmmm....
He's cute, and likes to fish!!



 I could definitely tell you all about the mechanics (blood sugar testing, site changes, carbohydrate counting), or about the insurance companies, or about the day I was diagnosed, or about all the friends I have met by having the disease. But I thought I might do something a little different. 


I asked the "F" (Chris) to write what its like to live with me, and my friend D. I couldn't believe how willing he was to write about this seemingly boring topic. And when I opened up his "homework" it brought tears to my eyes. I hope you enjoy his words, and thank you Chris, for being such a wonderful person in my life!!!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Here is my homework assignment...Halloween assignment that is. The kids stopped coming to the door an hour or so ago and since then I have been pondering my "homework".  Being that today is the beginning of D awareness month, I am supposed to write a blog describing living with April. 

April and I have been living together now for a little over a year. In that time I have had the chance to see both the extreme highs and lows of the Glucoaster. To be honest, I’m not a fan. Many would tell me that I don’t know what it’s like living with diabetes.  While I would beg to differ, I can’t. April is usually keen on ‘sharing’ the physical and emotional sides of the ups and downs. And much like having type-1, they’re ‘shared’ with me whether I want them or not. 

Also, I live with the constant worry and stress of wondering about a number on a machine often hundreds or thousands of miles away, where, while I pride myself on being a rescuer of many sorts, I’m useless. Undoubtedly, this has kept me up more than one night.   

But, April, before you don the albatross, relax; land is fast approaching. I do, with all my heart, wish April didn’t have diabetes. I wish so many of the young people, and old, around the world didn’t. Well… almost. If April didn’t have diabetes, she would, inevitably, be a different person. While I do wish that April didn’t have to endure the stomach wrenching turns of the glucoster, her disease has forced her to be a strong fighter that many, not living in a house with diabetes, wouldn’t understand. 

That ‘fight’ in April is what makes me love her. It seems like every week some person or entity tells her ‘no’. (recently the #!$%!@ FAA) It is then when April shines her brightest. Her ability to pick herself up and continue on un-phased is simply awe-inspiring. She posts blogs and tells stories of these run-ins that, I know, inspire others. April is a guiding light in the diabetes community who is helping pioneer a path through a jungle of litigation like no regular lumberjack could, no matter how big the saw.

I love you April, for the exact person you are, no more, no less, and I can’t wait to spend the rest of my life with you.


To the D Community:

We all have our inspirations. I charge you to thank yours.  Whether it’s April, Kerri S. (@SixUntilMe), or whoever, please let them know. Comment on posts, call ‘em, mail a postcard, or thank them in person. Your comments mean more to them than you would ever imagine.


Well, Izzy and Gordo think it’s bed time… guess I should tuck them in…

Chris Out.
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I told you he was amazing....and if you were a doubter, well, this should be some proof ;-) Thank you so much Chris!!!!

Comments

  1. amazing. yes. beautiful, thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes April, I think he is a keeper!! I think we are off to the JDRF tomorrow morning at Tempe Town Lake.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for taking care of my April, Chris!

    ReplyDelete
  4. OMgosh your fiance is awesome. :) And so are you!

    ReplyDelete

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