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It's kinda like the 2-mile-high club, except not at all.

Yes, I just used "mile high club" in a blog title, get over it.

I've been severely lacking in my Colorado blog posting duties. In fact, I'm sure Dave has checked my blog a million times trying to catch a glimpse at my sure-to-be-incredible Colorado update...just kidding ;-) But seriously.

I usually try to capture a few lessons learned when I experience something new in flight test, for instance here, here, and here. So without further ado...the mile-high list of learned things (that was a pun...maybe the altitude is getting to me...can hypoxia symptoms = terrible use of puns? ... ok, back on topic):

1,000 ft: 04:30 flight briefs are not that bad...lesson learned: get yourself some crack coffee to make it through an hour of driving, an hour of bad winds, and 4+ hours of maintenance repairs. Watch out for that two o'clock yearning for some FTE-NT (flight test engineer nap time); it hits like a 1,640 lb ton of concrete. You know what I mean.

2,000 ft: Old guys sure can make some pretty hand plots. That's right...I said HAND plots. These are Excel quality, people...special characters and all. Maybe I will be able to make some badass hand plots when I'm old ;-)

3,000 ft: It turns out the CG of your suitcase shifts forward slightly greatly with 10 pounds of aircraft bolts inside. My genius must have kicked when I packed them on top.

4,000 ft: Everyone thinks it sucks to be a girl in a field with so many males. This couldn't be further from the truth. Just think about the bathroom situation real quick. 'Nuf said.

5,000 ft: DUDE! Baby doll heads are creepy. The end.

6,000 ft: You realize there are relatively few Flight Test Engineers in this world after you post a picture at Leadville and receive a Facebook comment from your 76 year-old Boeing friend telling you stories about when he worked there in 1955. Honestly, it probably hasn't changed much.


7,000 ft: Did anyone else think the sodas were more bubbly up here? Maybe that was just the hypoxia again.

8,000 ft: Make some time to forget about helicopters at least once a day and just soak up the beautiful scenery. This usually happened for me while looking at Mt. Massive and waiting for the coffee to kick in.

9,000 ft: When they say it's a "music festival" don't be fooled...it's really a music-heymanIjustsmokedadoobie-festival.

And the 10,000 footer......

10,000 ft: Pimped out helicopters look even sexier with those 14,000 ft peaks behind them. I'm not sayin'...I'm just sayin'.

Peace out, Colorado....see you on the flip side.

Comments

  1. Carbon dioxide in a soda will definitely come out of solution faster at lower ambient pressures.

    ReplyDelete

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