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Nerdy Nutrients

It was on our car ride back from Arizona that the BF and I decided we had some work to do - nutritionally speaking that is. We both need to lose a few pounds, clean up our eating habits, increase/start an exercise routine, and stop making excuses. While we both suck and almost all of those things, we decided that maybe combined we could help each other out. Hopefully one of us is motivated when the other one needs some motivation. I asked all of you, my faithful readers for some quick, easy, healthy recipes [you can still email me some at nerdyapril@gmail.com] and you delivered. 

But tonight's dinner didn't actually come from a recipe...that's right, little old Nerdy April herself dreamed it up. And.....it was so simple, easy and delicious, I thought I would share just in case ya'll need some Nerdy Nutrients.

Ingredients:

Flat bread (I bought the garlic flavor and it was delicious)
Fresh Asiago Cheese
Fresh Goat Cheese
Mushrooms (can be the "fancy" package, but I just bought regular and it was good)
Olive Oil
Seasoning to taste for dipping (I did olive oil with salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning)

Directions: Get out a pan (I used a pizza pan because it was clean). Spray with cooking spray (duh! My mom told me to ALWAYS spray except Angel Food Cake). Place flat bread on pan and add desired amount of cheese and mushrooms. Bake for 10-15 minutes (until cheese is melty) at 350 degrees. 

I'm telling you it was delicious, and 30 carbs for half a flat bread (for those who need it). Tonight we just ate the flat bread with salads topped with our favorite toppings (pecans, cheese, etc.). And shout out to Denise for the Ken's Creamy Caesar Lite dressing, it was perfect!!!

Oh, and don't forget the post dinner entertainment!!

Nerdy April: Chriiisssss!!!!! Noooooo!!! Don't eat Pee-wee!!!! Think of the calories!!!!!

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