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The 3 Month...

B!t*&fest err, checkup.

Well folks, it's time for another quarterly installment. And in lieu of boring you (oh wait, I already am...) with long, drawn out adjective ridden, emotional statements emphasizing my hatred for all thing "Endocrinologist-related", I will instead highlight the Good News and the Bad News. Keep in mind, I am being candid, so please don't be judgin'.

Good News: I only had to wait 5 minutes past my scheduled appointment time. This is huge. Seriously.

Bad News: My weight is "trending up" says the 40 lb overweight doc. Thanks. Thankyouverymuch. I have been noticing sir, in fact I listed it on my "update sheet" for the nurse before you made me feel like a pile of dogcrap. Because, you see, I have been making efforts to reverse the "trending" and am having a very difficult time. Anyway, I will complain more about you in a few lines...

Good News: My A1c is down 0.1%. It may not be much, but hey, its "trending" in the right direction, unlike said weight.

Bad News: After asking the doc several questions about reversing the trend towards heavy, and getting no answers even remotely worth a damn, I have decided Mr. Doc, that you, yourself are Bad News. Because it sucks when Wikipedia is more informative than you.

Ridiculous News: And Mr. Doc? Could you be any more ridiculous than ripping me a new one for my weight and then proceeding to tell me on your way out that "remember Thanksgiving and Christmas are only 2 days [insert cheesy grin]"?!?!?!?! Ri-gosh-darn-diculous.

And finally,

The Picture News: Here's the waiting room, or as I like to call it the "WAITING to get pissed off" ROOM pic for the Flickr group Waiting With Diabetes.


Overall News: I think I should have waited until after the JDRF walk to get the requisite guilty/depressed feeling courtesy of 'le doctor. Ughh...I am "le tired" of him. And if you are pissy like me today too, then I suggest you watch one of my favorite short films of all time.

And just a reminder, there is still time to donate for my JDRF walk on Sunday! Shout out to Mom and Dad for your donation ;-)

Comments

  1. Hey! That place looks familiar. My appt is on Monday, too bad we couldn't wait together. When's your next appointment scheduled? ;-)

    I'm sorry that you're feeling frustrated with him. He can be kind of insensitive at times. Congrats on the lowering A1c! Trending towards the right directions is always better than no trend at all. I just have to remember that I only see him once a quarter, barely enough time to really grasp my diabetes management. I've learned so much more via the DOC and educating myself.

    You are my D-sista, Nerdy April! I hope your frustration for le doctor doesn't frustrate your diabetes management.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Aww Holly, you are so sweet (pun intended!). I guess I just miss my office back in Arizona where they brought up new ideas, products, support groups, etc. It seemed they gave me the cutting edge info I wanted, instead of me trying to figure it all out on my own and then bringing it up to you-know-who. I definitely agree that the DOC is soooo helpful and supportive, and there 24/7. I'm so glad to have friends like you to vent to!!! Thanks for the support! And my next appointment is Jan 26 at 8:30. Haha!

    ReplyDelete
  3. OK, I'll see if they'll let me do that then. I love having a waiting buddy (even for just 5 min.).

    Yeah, le doctor is not too keen on new ideas or products. Whenever I ask him about that he always sends me to the Diabetes Center across the street. He's strictly there to diagnose and prescribe. I didn't even get on board with the pump until I met you, and a CGM until I saw Kerri had one. Just goes to show that not all medical treatment is done at le hospital. =/

    ReplyDelete

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