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The Birthday

Since my birthday is relatively close to the new year, I like to perform a year-in-review of sorts on February 4. What have I accomplished this year? A lot actually, in fact I think this was probably one of my most productive years in the history of April. So here are ‘23’ of the accomplishments worth noting…

(1) We finally got the ball rolling on our NASA UAV, and now it is flying!

(2) I presented all of my engineering analysis related to the UAV at a NASA Symposium in April.

(3) I made my first “adult” purchase: a car. I absolutely love my 2006 Ford Fusion [aka Ned, the NASCAR]!

(4) I continued teaching my two piano students. They are doing so great, and I know they will continue to develop their talents even though I’m not there.

(5) I was selected for an internship at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL summer 2009. This opportunity allowed me to contribute to the Ares I Upper Stage development which is something I am proud of, even if it does get cancelled.

(6) I started this blog!

(7) I prepared a poster and presented my summer internship at a NASA event.

(8) My blog post entitled Diabetes: Master of Invisibility was featured on Keri’s Diabetes Blog SUM during her blog carnival.

(9) I completed my NASA outreach hours at Emerson Elementary School. This was the sole purpose for the famous tin-can Ares I Rocket. I taught the kids about the LRO mission (since it was impacting that week) and about our future travels to the moon.

(10)I passed all my classes (Senior Design, Rocket Propulsion, Entrepreneurship for Engineers, and Vibration Analysis).

(11)I graduated!!!!!! Hurray!

(12)I was offered 2.5 jobs (I am going to count the second interview with General Dynamics as 0.5, since I turned down the interview. I know, you should never turn down an interview, but seriously the first one was 3 hours long and the job sounded horrible).

(13)I finished 5 and ½ years working with the Resurrection Bellchoirs. We finished out strong with a bunch of holiday concerts and Masses. I already miss working with these fine people.

(14)I completed 3 years as secretary of the Resurrection Parish Council.

(15)I accepted a job working for the Army as a Flight Test Engineer in Huntsville, AL.

(16)I had a great holiday season lighting up the house, decorating inside, eating tons of horribly delicious food, and spending some quality time with the family.

(17)Chris helped me drive Ned out to Alabama from Arizona just after new years.

(18)I moved all my crap (well, ok, the movers moved most of it) to Alabama and have my own little one-bedroom apartment.

(19)I bought a new MacBook Pro…so I can Skype with my family (note: I did not buy it simply for that purpose, but it completes the task amazingly!).

(20)I had three letters to the editor printed this year (1 was in both the Huntsville Times and the Mesa Tribune and the other was just recently in the Huntsville Times).

(21)I joined the Huntsville Concert Band.

(22)I’m slowly venturing into the land of “cooking.” I started small, chicken noodle soup, and last night I made some banana bread and my own birthday angel-food cake.

(23)I learned that hardwork does pay off, but there’s always more hard work ahead. I can’t wait to see what happens this year!

Thanks for all the birthday wishes everyone!

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