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30 Things About Type 1 Diabetes You May Not Know

In an attempt to bring Invisible Illness week full circle, I have decided to include this list made up by the people at http://invisibleillnessweek.com. I promise to return to space-blogging next week :-)

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

1. The illness I live with is: Type 1 Diabetes


2. I was diagnosed with it in the year: 1998 (barely, December 30th)


3. But I had symptoms since: about November 1998


4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is: taking shots and poking my finger several times a day.


5. Most people assume: you get used to the shots after a while...


6. The hardest part about mornings are: waking up low and already exhausted...


7. My favorite medical TV show is: scrubs :-) Especially Turk, since he has Diabetes!


8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is: well I could probably live without my pump and my glucose meter, but I don't really want to try it...


9. The hardest part about nights are: when I have to change my site...for some reason at night it is really hard to feel "ok" about having to stab yourself with a needle


10. Each day I take 0 pills & vitamins. But I do take a constant stream of insulin...


11. Regarding alternative treatments I: am not sure if I will ever see a cure in my lifetime...and I'm not sure if they can really come up with any alternative treatments besides insulin...haha...


12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose: NO ILLNESS!


13. Regarding working and career: at the moment Diabetes has really put a kink in my Astronaut dream...we'll see how that plays out in the future...


14. People would be surprised to know: that I HATE needles!


15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been: that I may not be able to be an astronaut :-(


16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was: I don't really have an answer to this one yet, although I think I may try SCUBA diving soon...


17. The commercials about my illness: there isn't very many for TYPE 1...just old people with Type 2.


18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is: not having to count every carbohydrate that goes into my mouth...


19. It was really hard to have to give up: sleep overs at friends' houses right after I was diagnosed...mom said I couldn't sleep over until I could give myself a shot...


20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is: well, I was diagnosed when I was 11, therefore I have lots of new hobbies...but I would say: blogging about having Type 1.


21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would: go on a spontaneous trip far away and not worry about how many sites, reservoirs, test strips, meters, lancets, insulin pens, pen needles, syringes, glucose tablets, or insulin bottles I have with me!!! Hurray!!!!
22. My illness has taught me: empathy


23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is: "I could never give myself shots" cause honestly, if you were going to die, you probably could...


24. But I love it when people: understand or try to understand that Diabetes is not my fault...


25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is: "What seems to us as bitter trials are often blessings in disguise" --Oscar Wilde


26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them: that there are people (like me!) who actually know what it feels like!


27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is: how you can feel guilty for having something that isn't even your fault...


28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was: stay up late with me until I felt better...


29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Week because: I want more people to be informed...


30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel: ECSTATIC! That someone is actually reading my blog...and maybe even learning a little about this little diabetic!

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