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Random Tidbits!

Yes, today's post will be completely random. Let's be honest...my life isn't that exciting!

1. As I'm sure a few of you know, yesterday my sister Heather was in a car accident. Luckily she was the only one hurt, and its not that bad, just some scrapes and burns on her chin from the airbags. I'm really glad she's ok!!! Send her some chocolate or something :-)


2. Last night was a strange night, and strange night usually means 'diabetes goes crazy'. When I got home we were talking to Heather about the accident, making phone calls, etc. and we decided to go to Diary Queen to cheer her up (Hurray!!! I looovveeee DQ!!!!). Anyway, this ended up being my dinner and I went to bed with a blood sugar reading of 90. Not bad, a little low for bedtime, so I temp-basaled my pump (basically, turned off the automatic insulin delivery) for 2 hours. Well I woke up at 11:30pm and felt awful, reached for my test kit and saw a reading of 33. People: that is super low...in fact its only my second lowest number EVER! I ate a midnight snack, tested a few more times and finished sleeping! Hurray, I'm not dead!

3. The shuttle launch was postponed again...dangit. It is now, as of this writing scheduled for Friday night at 8:59pm Arizona time. Hurray! Sidenote/sorta related note: today in my rocket propulsion class our teacher was doing an example which was to calculate if an RSRM could make it to Mars. Well, he said RSRM stood for Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (the ones used on the shuttle...the white things!)...which is totally incorrect...in fact it stands for Reusable Solid Rocket Motor. Although, I decided it was best not to correct him as my grade my be inversely proportional to my comment.

4. I may be talking about this a lot in the near future so I thought I would explain it now: MAE 468 Senior Aerospace Design Class. Basically, this is my capstone design course (hurray, I'm almost done, hopefully!!). It is unique in that we are in teams and the majority of the team members are not from ASU, in fact they are from universities located in Mexico, Singapore and India. Which means, yes, we are either 2, 12, or 15 hours difference. This makes things difficult. Especially meetings, assigning work and communicating. Oh, and what is our design project you ask? It is to design in its entirety a UAV to loiter for 24 hours, carry a 500+ lb payload and fit inside a 20'X5'X5' shipping container. There are several other design parameters, but they are more specific like the type of propulsion elements, antenna locations, altitude and mission requirements. Bottom line: its going to be a lot of work!

5. Also, bellchoir is starting up this week. I have a lot of music to mark between now and Saturday afternoon! Hopefully this will be a very good year....I'm excited!

Comments

  1. you are cute! This is a very interesting friday top five... Since its done on thursday! anywho... gordo is laying upside down on the floor under might feet trying to eat them..

    love!

    Chris

    PS> ur grade is inversly proportional.... you kinda sound like a nerdy engineer... fdfvvd

    that was gordo.. he says he misses you...

    love!

    ReplyDelete

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