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I Heart Space

Yes, its true! I 'heart' space. Shocking, right?!

People can say anything...even, "Ya, I wanna be an astronaut." Which usually follows with...."Wait, you have to actually be smart and have a degree and like, uh, do work and stuff?!"

Ya. You do. A lot of work. And I wouldn't trade it for anything in the world (ok, maybe a cure for diabetes, but lets stop dreaming!!)!

The fact is, I have loved space since I was a wee one...mom said I was born in the "stargazer" orientation...if that doesn't scream "ASTRONAUT" then I don't know what does.

I started reading all about space in kindergarten
I went to a local space camp in 3rd grade and 5th grade and 6th grade
I took the inaugural flight of the Boeing DS-46 simulator
I wrote a space related letter to the editor when I was 15 that was published
all of my school essays were about space
I built models and even designed my own space station
I went to the national space camp when I was 13
I was chosen to be the mission commander at Space Camp
I took advanced math classes starting in 6th grade
I learned Russian in high school to prepare for my stay on the International Space Station
I integrated stories about space into my high school newspaper as editor
I gave speeches at the Mesa Public Schools Space Shuttle dedications
I got an internship with Boeing
I worked hard and made number 13 out of 620 in my graduating class
I got accepted into the Aerospace Engineering program at ASU
I taught kids about aviation at a local Aviation Camp
I inspired kids, college students and adults as a counselor at Aviation Challenge in Huntsville, AL
I got an internship with the NASA Space Grant to build an autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
I got an internship at Orbital Sciences working on real rocket hardware
and then I finally got an internship at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center working on the Ares-I rocket

Yes, it is fairly safe to say, my whole life has been geared towards that ultimate goal...the one that comes with a shiny pair of wings, a T-38 jet and a whole lot of hard work.

I guess I decided to include this post after my experiences today. At the Parish Council retreat I went on today (I was voted the secratary....again...dangit...) we had to go around and introduce ourselves, tell which ministries we are involved in, our job, etc. Apparently people think you're wierd when you are the bellchoir director, but you are majoring in Aerospace Engineering and you worked at NASA this summer...strange looks = April, you are a "CrAzY pErSoN!!!".

Oh well...story of my life...and now the equation I have developed for April's Theory of Her Life (which is much more important then any of the E=mc^2 crap...) is shown in Equation 1 below:

Strange Looks + Snickers/laughing/"ppffffffff!!!!" = validation that I am still on the right path
Equation 1. Theory of April's Life

Now, I have four classes left until I can officially apply to become an astronaut. And yes, it is extremely doubtful that I will be selected the first time, if ever. But....I don't care. Even if I never get to be an astronaut I will have the satisfaction of knowing that I did everything I could and tried my hardest to achieve my goal.

So, yes, it really is rocket science......to one day sit on a rocket and reach that firmament above Earth where everyone knows dreams really do come true.

Comments

  1. I heard you worked with one of the smartest guys on earth at NASA and he had to tell you everything...... I believe he should be the astronaut maybe your commander one day..... That would be cool wouldn't it Zuber Buber :) haha

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ahh lance.... I read your comment and completely forgot what I was going to say about this blog.

    Ape- To be honest this blog was kindof a let down for me... I wanted to be an astronaut too, but you have to WORK? pssshhhhh forget that! haha

    I love you and your lofty goals. You know I will always support you and do anything I can to help!(which may include but is not limited to: staying up late to help with the 23,478,924 page application, begging my teacher, Dr. Mike Griffin, ect.)

    always
    -Chris

    ReplyDelete

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